Men and Hearing Loss

Men and Hearing Loss

“You don’t know what you got till it’s gone.” Depending upon your age, these words may recall the lyrics of a 1970s folk song by Joni Mitchell. But you might want to listen up and consider these words another kind of warning—especially if you’re a man.

More people with hearing loss. Today, twice as many people have hearing loss as in the 1980s. And sadly the trend isn’t improving. A recent report predicted that the number of U.S. adults with hearing loss will rise to nearly a quarter of the population in the next 40 years.1 Perhaps we’ve adapted just a bit too well to all the noise in our environment—from rock shows and subways to motorcycles and kids’ toys.

The story is even more sobering for men. That’s because hearing loss may be more common and severe in men than in women. One likely reason is that more men than women are exposed to sustained loud noises.2

Links to other health issues. Increasingly, researchers are seeing links between hearing loss and other health issues—problems that often affect men. These include sleep apnea, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression, and dementia.3 Consider this:

  • Sleep apnea is strongly linked to hearing loss at both high and low frequencies.
  • The inner ear is so sensitive to blood flow that it could be the “canary in the coal mine” for cardiovascular disease. In other words, blood vessel blockages might show up here first.
  • Hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes.
  • Research also shows a link between hearing loss and dementia.
  • In people with both depression and hearing loss, use of hearing aids reduces symptoms of depression.3

Protect your hearing. You may have already experienced some hearing loss. But that doesn’t mean you can’t protect what’s left. Start here:

  • Get earplugs for loud events—and wear them! Even the simple foam plugs you can buy in our store can help protect your ears.
  • Let’s talk painkillers. A study in men found that taking painkillers like aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), or acetaminophen only two times a week significantly increased the risk of hearing loss. These drugs may do this by reducing blood flow to the inner ear. If you’re concerned, let’s discuss this.4
  • Consider an iron test. By contrast, iron helps carry blood to the inner ear. That may be why low levels have been linked to hearing problems.1
  • Check the volume. It’s really tempting to turn up the volume, especially for your favorite tunes. Resist!

Of course, your doctor should first rule out a medical problem that could be causing any hearing loss. Then, let me know if you would like any guidance about specialists who can help evaluate your hearing or help you choose a hearing device. Just remember: these are not your father’s hearing aids. Today’s hearing aids are nearly invisible, can adjust to different environments, and benefit from many high-tech features.3

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

Sources

1.       Men’s Journal: “You’re Losing Hearing Faster Than You Think.” Available at: http://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/articles/youre-losing-hearing-faster-than-you-think-w475579 Accessed 4-27-17.
2.       Medscape: “Age-related hearing loss in men.” Available at: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/520157 Accessed 4-27-17.
3.       Better Hearing Institute: “Calling All Men: Protect Your Well-Being with a Hearing Check.” Available at: http://www.betterhearing.org/news/calling-all-men-protect-your-well-being-hearing-check Accessed 4-27-17.
4.       Curhan SG et al. Am J Med.2010;123(3):231–237. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2831770/ Accessed 4-27-17.

Pharmacy Conference Helps Local Pharmacy Technician Improve Professional Skills

Pharmacy Conference Helps Local Pharmacy Technician Improve Professional Skills

Sun Praire, WI, April 11, 2017

Bridgett Edgar, pharmacy technician at Pharm A Save in Monroe  recently attended the IPC Independent Pharmacy Conference in Scottsdale, AZ.  At the three day conference she participated in nearly 10 hours of continuing pharmacy education courses.

Meeting organizers said that during the educational sessions attendess were updated on the latest trends in prescription medications.  They were also brought up to date on the latest rules and regulations affecting the practice of pharmacy.   Edgar says she was pleased with the information she gained and will use it as she strives to insure her patients get the maximum benefit from the medication Pharm A Save provides.   Edgar participated in the meeting as the official pharmacy technician representative of the Washington State Pharmacist Association.

According Don Anderson, President and CEO of the Independent Pharmacy Cooperative (IPC) said a primary goal of the meeting was to provide formal business classes and a forum where pharmacy owners can learn from others whose experience will help them take better care of their customers.

About IPC: Formed in 1983 IPC is the nation’s largest group purchasing organization.  The cooperative serves the needs of nearly 6000 independent pharmacy owners across the country.  With locations in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin and Phoenix, Arizona, IPC prides itself on providing access to programs and services that enable pharmacy owners to operate more modern, up to date and profitable pharmacies.    Continue reading Pharmacy Conference Helps Local Pharmacy Technician Improve Professional Skills

April is Community Service Month

Community Service Month – What does that mean to you? Do you get overwhelmed and wonder how in the world you could squeeze in one more thing?

Community service is a broad phrase. Some think about donating to a local organization with time or money. Others volunteer with a church. It doesn’t really how you “step out”, there are many ways to get more involved with your community.

I want to share with you some of the things that will be keeping us busy in April.  Pharm A Save Monroe has made it a goal to get out in the community even more this year.

April 1st 2017 – Pharm A Save Monroe donated instant ice packs to the Sky Valley Little League. This was our way of helping the kick off to their season be a successful one. Unfortuntly it rained out, but they are set for the upcoming season.

April 8th 2017Monroe’s Senior Center Auction!  Pharm A Save Monroe donated a basket of goodies to be auctioned off at this years East County Senior Center Auction. All proceeds from the auction go to support Monroe’s senior center. This year, we also have a table and will enjoy the dinner & dining experience, as well as fight of dessert. If you have never been to this auction, it is a wonderful night out for a great cause.

April 12th 2017 – Pharm A Save Monroe sponsors a lunch at the Monroe East County Senior Center on the 2nd Wednesday of each month. When United Way cut a vital piece of funding to our local senior center, we knew we had to help in anyway possible. We started this outreach in October, and since then have been able to spend time with those who can come.  The center has lunch every day, for a nominal fee. Lunch is open to all ages so we get a chance to catch up a variety of people.  Pharm A Save was able to offer flu vaccines and one on one time with our Pharmacist Shaunett Rph.  Having this time outside of the building and helping others is truly rewarding. A big shout out to Jacob and Candace at the Senior Center for a fantastic job of organizing and planning. And, thank you to the other weekly meal sponsors Brookdale Monroe and EvergreenHealth Monroe. What an absolutely rewarding experience this has been.

April 15th 2017 – Monroe will have their 21st Annual Community Easter egg hunt.    Pharm A Save Monroe will set up a booth and have games & prizes for the kiddos. Be sure to stop by and say hello!

April 15th 2017The Sky Valley Chamber Dinner and Auction – We have been involved in the auction committee and are looking forward to the 25th Annual Dinner and Auction for the Sky Valley Chamber (Sultan and surrounding areas). The event is a Masquerade theme, and is taking place at Camp Houston in Gold Bar WA.

April 29th 2017 – Healthy Kids day at the Monroe WA YMCA – We will be set up with goodies for the kids as well as information for the parents on how we can help with keeping kids healthy. We offer free vitamins for children, so this will be a great opportunity to share this with the families.

There will be more in the coming weeks. Pharm A Save will be hosting the “Blue Door” from the Monroe Boys and Girls club the week of May 14th. I encourage you to follow their project on twitter : @MonroeBlueDoor

If you see us out in your community, be sure to come say hello! We have a busy year ahead!

 

 

 

Seasonal Allergies: Trying to Nip Them in the Bud

Seasonal Allergies: Trying to Nip Them in the Bud

Itchy eyes, runny nose, sneezing, fatigue…. These are just a few of the signs of seasonal allergies—also known as hay fever.1 And get ready: It looks like we may have a real doozy of an allergy season this year.2 Milder winter temperatures in places can cause plants to pollinate early. And a rainier spring leads to quick plant growth, as well as an increase in mold. 1

Allergic reactions mostly occur when your body responds to a “false alarm.” And, as you well know, there isn’t a cure for seasonal allergies. But there’s no reason to let this time of year take all the spring out of your step! Arm yourself with information.

Monitor climate factors. When checking the weather and planning your day, keep these things in mind:

  • Heat and high humidity promote the growth of molds.
  • Cool nights and warm days allow tree, grass, and ragweed pollens to thrive.
  • In spring and summer, tree and grass pollen levels tend to peak in the evening.
  • In late summer and early fall, ragweed pollen levels tend to peak in the morning.
  • Windy and warm days often result in surging pollen counts.
  • After a rainfall, pollen counts may go up, even though the rain temporarily washes pollen away.1

Avoid your triggers. If allergies are making you miserable, you may want to see an allergist. Specializing in allergies, this person can help you figure out what triggers your symptoms. Then you can find ways to cut off those triggers at the pass. During allergy season:

  • Keep windows and doors shut in your car and home.
  • Monitor pollen and mold counts daily. Weather reporters often provide this information.
  • After working or playing outdoors, take a shower, wash your hair, and change your clothes. 1
  • When doing chores outside, wear a NIOSH-rated filter mask. Better yet? Delegate!
  • Be on the lookout for mold, which can build up in moist months. A deep spring cleaning will help get rid of mold and other allergens. Cleanliness may not be close to godliness. But it sure may help you feel better.
  • Clear the air with a HEPA room air cleaner rated with a Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR). If you have central air, use air filters with a MERV rating of 11 or 12. Change air filters every three months.3

Relieve your symptoms. Corticosteroid nasal sprays, decongestants, antihistamines. These are examples of over-the-counter drugs that can help relieve your symptoms. Come talk to me to make sure you’re using them the right way. If side effects are a problem, we can work together to come up with a solution. For example, a few possible side effects of antihistamines are sleepiness, dry mouth, constipation, and light-headedness.4

For some people, allergies can lead to or coexist with other health problems such as asthma or sinusitis. Asthma narrows or blocks the airways. Sinusitis is caused by inflammation or infection of cavities behind the nose.5 Just one more reason why working with your doctor and me is a good idea.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

Sources:

  1. ACAAI: “Seasonal Allergies.” Available at: http://acaai.org/allergies/seasonal-allergies Accessed 3-3-17.

      2.      ABC30.com: “Seasonal allergy sufferers feeling the change in weather.” Available at:        http://abc30.com/health/seasonal-allergy-sufferers-feeling-the-change-in-weather/1780067/ Accessed 3-3-17.

       3.      ACAAI: “5 things to Do to Fell Better During Spring Allergy Season.” Available at:     http://acaai.org/news/5-things-do-feel-better-during-spring-allergy-season Accessed: 2-23-17.

  1. Merck Manual: “Seasonal Allergies.” Available at: http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/immune-disorders/allergic-reactions-and-other-hypersensitivity-disorders/seasonal-allergies Accessed 3-3-17.

NIHMedlinePlus: “How to Control Your Seasonal Allergies.” Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/spring13/articles/spring13pg22-23.html Accessed 3-3-17.