Fair Day Sale & Lemon Sticks! Say what?

FAIR DAY SALlemon stick paradeE & LEMON STICKS!

Join us for Fair Days!

It is time for the Evergreen State Fair! We are kicking it off by offering discounts STORE WIDE and a variety of items, beginning Thursday 8/24/2017!

  • Vionic Sandals – 30% off
  • Lift Chairs – $100 off
  • Compression Socks – 25% off
  • Oximeter Plus – $29.99
  • TENS units – 25% off

Plus MORE!

Pharm A Save Monroe will also be set up in Downtown Monroe on main street for the Parade market on Saturday 8/26/2017.

We will have LEMON Sticks for your drinking pleasure!

 How many of you remember these?

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Z-Fence: All-Natural Mosquito and Insect Repellent

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Mosquitoes are not only annoying, but they also carry a number of serious diseases like malaria, yellow fever, typhus, West Nile virus, and Zika. And many mosquito repellents today contain DEET, which is effective, but not very safe, especially when it comes to children. Did you know that only about a third of insect repellents on the market today are safe for kids?

Pharm A Save Monroe now carries  Z Bracelet, Z Band and Z Clip – a NO DEET alternative to those pesky mosquitoes !

How It Works

The entire Z-Fence line is based on specially-formulated repellents that are gentle, all-natural, and safe for the whole family. They work through a slow-release technology, which diffuses into soft material so it releases at a steady and consistent rate. The release of the repellent creates a 6-foot wide “safe zone” around the user or area, which serves as a barrier against insects.
The ingredients used in Z-Fence products are made from a mix of plant extracts, including geraniol, thyme, geranium oil, peppermint oil, and citronella. These are all registered with the EPA as acceptable active ingredients with minimum risk. Our products have also been tested at an independent lab here in the U.S. to make sure they are both safe and effective.

For outdoor lovers, we carry e a variety of wearable items that include a similar natural, slow-release repellent built in. Even with all-natural repellent formulas, some people can have reactions to putting insect repellent directly on their skin, and our wearable products offer a great alternative. The braided Z-Bracelet is actually infused with the natural repellent. The neoprene Z-Band has an adjustable fit, and holds a replaceable repellent tablet, as does the Z-Clip which easily goes anywhere. The bands and clips each include 2 tablets, which last up to 120 hours, so there’s no need to re-apply like you would with a spray. Packs of extra Z-Tablet refills are of course available.

With Z-Fence, you can stop worry about the dangers of mosquitoes and harmful chemicals, and get back to enjoying life outdoors!

 

Protect Yourself from the Sun

Protect Yourself from the Sun

Did you know that skin cancer rates are on the rise in the U.S., where it is the most common type of cancer?1 It’s no wonder. Just in the past year alone, one-third of the adult population has been sunburned at least once. And that lobster-red look is a clear sign of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays—a known cause of skin cancer, which can impact any age, gender, or race.1,2

Risks of tanning. But you’re not off the hook if you stop at tanning. That’s your body’s response to sun injury.1 When you tan—either outdoors or indoors—you increase your risk of melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer. You also increase your risk of:

  • Premature skin aging—wrinkles and age spots
  • Damaged skin texture
  • Potentially blinding eye diseases1

Here’s the silver lining in this gloomy cloud: Avoiding the sun’s UV rays is one of the best ways to prevent skin cancer.1

General guidelines. You probably know the drill, but it bears repeating:

  1. Seek shade and stay out of the sun, if you can, when UV rays are strongest—from 10 am to 4 pm.
  2. Be extra careful at higher altitudes where skin burns faster.
  3. Limit exposure to water, sand, snow, and concrete—surfaces that reflect light.
  4. Use sun protection even on cloudy days, when certain types of UV rays can be stronger.
  5. Rely on diet and supplements to get your vitamin D, not the sun.2,3

Sunscreen. Don’t use a product that combines sunscreen and insect repellant. Reapplying it will expose you to too much of the repellent’s ingredients. Also, avoid spray tans and bronzers—they won’t protect your skin from UV rays.4

Do choose sunscreens that:

  • Block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Are labeled with sun protection factor (SPF) 30 or higher.
  • Are water resistant—they’re more protective when you sweat.
  • Are products you will use consistently. Generally, creams are best for dry skin and the face, gels work well for hairy areas, and sticks are easier to apply near eyes. Mineral-based sunscreens—such as zinc oxide or titanium dioxide—work well if you have sensitive skin.2,3

Wear sunscreen every day, even if you plan to be outside a short time. For best results, apply it generously 15 to 30 minutes before you go outside to all exposed areas—don’t forget your feet and ears. (A lip balm works best for your lips.) Always reapply after swimming or sweating and about every two hours or as often as the package suggests.2,3

Sun-protective clothing. In addition to sunscreen, wear clothing that can better protect you such as:

  • A hat with a wide brim. This works better than a baseball cap or visor for shielding your whole face from the sun.
  • Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Loose-fitting, unbleached, tightly woven fabrics.
  • Special clothing that absorbs UV rays.3

Don’t forget to protect those parts of your body that may be in constant sunlight— your nose, forehead, and eyes.  Questions about sun-protection products or other ways to protect your family in the sun? Remember, I’m right here—your ready resource.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

Sources:

  1. CDC: “The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer.” Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/consumer-booklet.pdf Accessed 6-6-17.
  2. American Academy of Dermatology: “Sunscreen FAQs.” Available at: https://www.aad.org/media/stats/prevention-and-care/sunscreen-faqs Accessed 6-6-17.
  3. MedlinePlus: “Sun Protection.” Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000378.htm Accessed 6-6-17.
  4. FDA: “5 Tips for a Healthy Vacation.” Available at: https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm389469.htm Accessed 6-6-17.

Flu Clinic – Let our Pharmacist’s come to your business!

I know, summer just started! But it is time to book offsite influenza vaccines for this fall.

Our Pharmacists, John and Shaunett will go to places of business to vaccinate the employees. Even better, we can bill the employee’s health insurance! That is right, as an employer, if the employee has health insurance, there is no out of pocket expense for you!

During the  2016-2017 season, Pharm A Save Monroe Pharmacist’s provided the vaccine’s for the Monroe School District employees, Damar Monroe, Ocean Beauty as well as other large groups & individuals in the Sky Valley Community.

Getting signed up is easy, just give me a call or send me an email. Our first round of vaccines are booking for September and October. Don’t wait to reserve your companies influenza vaccines,  get your onsite flu clinic scheduled today!

Bridgett Edgar – Pharmacy Technician/Owner

Pharm A Save Monroe – A Health Mart Pharmacy

(360) 794 7351 ext 202

bridgett@pasmonroe.com

 

 

 

Men and Hearing Loss

Men and Hearing Loss

“You don’t know what you got till it’s gone.” Depending upon your age, these words may recall the lyrics of a 1970s folk song by Joni Mitchell. But you might want to listen up and consider these words another kind of warning—especially if you’re a man.

More people with hearing loss. Today, twice as many people have hearing loss as in the 1980s. And sadly the trend isn’t improving. A recent report predicted that the number of U.S. adults with hearing loss will rise to nearly a quarter of the population in the next 40 years.1 Perhaps we’ve adapted just a bit too well to all the noise in our environment—from rock shows and subways to motorcycles and kids’ toys.

The story is even more sobering for men. That’s because hearing loss may be more common and severe in men than in women. One likely reason is that more men than women are exposed to sustained loud noises.2

Links to other health issues. Increasingly, researchers are seeing links between hearing loss and other health issues—problems that often affect men. These include sleep apnea, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression, and dementia.3 Consider this:

  • Sleep apnea is strongly linked to hearing loss at both high and low frequencies.
  • The inner ear is so sensitive to blood flow that it could be the “canary in the coal mine” for cardiovascular disease. In other words, blood vessel blockages might show up here first.
  • Hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes.
  • Research also shows a link between hearing loss and dementia.
  • In people with both depression and hearing loss, use of hearing aids reduces symptoms of depression.3

Protect your hearing. You may have already experienced some hearing loss. But that doesn’t mean you can’t protect what’s left. Start here:

  • Get earplugs for loud events—and wear them! Even the simple foam plugs you can buy in our store can help protect your ears.
  • Let’s talk painkillers. A study in men found that taking painkillers like aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), or acetaminophen only two times a week significantly increased the risk of hearing loss. These drugs may do this by reducing blood flow to the inner ear. If you’re concerned, let’s discuss this.4
  • Consider an iron test. By contrast, iron helps carry blood to the inner ear. That may be why low levels have been linked to hearing problems.1
  • Check the volume. It’s really tempting to turn up the volume, especially for your favorite tunes. Resist!

Of course, your doctor should first rule out a medical problem that could be causing any hearing loss. Then, let me know if you would like any guidance about specialists who can help evaluate your hearing or help you choose a hearing device. Just remember: these are not your father’s hearing aids. Today’s hearing aids are nearly invisible, can adjust to different environments, and benefit from many high-tech features.3

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

Sources

1.       Men’s Journal: “You’re Losing Hearing Faster Than You Think.” Available at: http://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/articles/youre-losing-hearing-faster-than-you-think-w475579 Accessed 4-27-17.
2.       Medscape: “Age-related hearing loss in men.” Available at: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/520157 Accessed 4-27-17.
3.       Better Hearing Institute: “Calling All Men: Protect Your Well-Being with a Hearing Check.” Available at: http://www.betterhearing.org/news/calling-all-men-protect-your-well-being-hearing-check Accessed 4-27-17.
4.       Curhan SG et al. Am J Med.2010;123(3):231–237. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2831770/ Accessed 4-27-17.

Seasonal Allergies: Trying to Nip Them in the Bud

Seasonal Allergies: Trying to Nip Them in the Bud

Itchy eyes, runny nose, sneezing, fatigue…. These are just a few of the signs of seasonal allergies—also known as hay fever.1 And get ready: It looks like we may have a real doozy of an allergy season this year.2 Milder winter temperatures in places can cause plants to pollinate early. And a rainier spring leads to quick plant growth, as well as an increase in mold. 1

Allergic reactions mostly occur when your body responds to a “false alarm.” And, as you well know, there isn’t a cure for seasonal allergies. But there’s no reason to let this time of year take all the spring out of your step! Arm yourself with information.

Monitor climate factors. When checking the weather and planning your day, keep these things in mind:

  • Heat and high humidity promote the growth of molds.
  • Cool nights and warm days allow tree, grass, and ragweed pollens to thrive.
  • In spring and summer, tree and grass pollen levels tend to peak in the evening.
  • In late summer and early fall, ragweed pollen levels tend to peak in the morning.
  • Windy and warm days often result in surging pollen counts.
  • After a rainfall, pollen counts may go up, even though the rain temporarily washes pollen away.1

Avoid your triggers. If allergies are making you miserable, you may want to see an allergist. Specializing in allergies, this person can help you figure out what triggers your symptoms. Then you can find ways to cut off those triggers at the pass. During allergy season:

  • Keep windows and doors shut in your car and home.
  • Monitor pollen and mold counts daily. Weather reporters often provide this information.
  • After working or playing outdoors, take a shower, wash your hair, and change your clothes. 1
  • When doing chores outside, wear a NIOSH-rated filter mask. Better yet? Delegate!
  • Be on the lookout for mold, which can build up in moist months. A deep spring cleaning will help get rid of mold and other allergens. Cleanliness may not be close to godliness. But it sure may help you feel better.
  • Clear the air with a HEPA room air cleaner rated with a Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR). If you have central air, use air filters with a MERV rating of 11 or 12. Change air filters every three months.3

Relieve your symptoms. Corticosteroid nasal sprays, decongestants, antihistamines. These are examples of over-the-counter drugs that can help relieve your symptoms. Come talk to me to make sure you’re using them the right way. If side effects are a problem, we can work together to come up with a solution. For example, a few possible side effects of antihistamines are sleepiness, dry mouth, constipation, and light-headedness.4

For some people, allergies can lead to or coexist with other health problems such as asthma or sinusitis. Asthma narrows or blocks the airways. Sinusitis is caused by inflammation or infection of cavities behind the nose.5 Just one more reason why working with your doctor and me is a good idea.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

Sources:

  1. ACAAI: “Seasonal Allergies.” Available at: http://acaai.org/allergies/seasonal-allergies Accessed 3-3-17.

      2.      ABC30.com: “Seasonal allergy sufferers feeling the change in weather.” Available at:        http://abc30.com/health/seasonal-allergy-sufferers-feeling-the-change-in-weather/1780067/ Accessed 3-3-17.

       3.      ACAAI: “5 things to Do to Fell Better During Spring Allergy Season.” Available at:     http://acaai.org/news/5-things-do-feel-better-during-spring-allergy-season Accessed: 2-23-17.

  1. Merck Manual: “Seasonal Allergies.” Available at: http://www.merckmanuals.com/home/immune-disorders/allergic-reactions-and-other-hypersensitivity-disorders/seasonal-allergies Accessed 3-3-17.

NIHMedlinePlus: “How to Control Your Seasonal Allergies.” Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/magazine/issues/spring13/articles/spring13pg22-23.html Accessed 3-3-17.

 

Mumps Outbreak – Monroe WA

Mumps is a mumps 2017contagious disease caused by a virus. It spreads through saliva or mucus from the mouth, nose, or throat. An infected person can spread the virus by

  • coughing, sneezing, or talking,
  • sharing items, such as cups or eating utensils, with others, and
    • touching objects or surfaces with unwashed                                                                        hands that are then touched by others.

Mumps likely spreads before the salivary glands begin to swell and up to five days after the swelling begins.

Mumps is best known for the puffy cheeks and swollen jaw that it causes. This is a result of swollen salivary glands.

The most common symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches
  • Tiredness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Swollen and tender salivary glands under the ears on one or both sides (parotitis)

Symptoms typically appear 16-18 days after infection, but this period can range from 12-25 days after infection.

Some people who get mumps have very mild or no symptoms, and often they do not know they have the disease.

Most people with mumps recover completely in a few weeks.

Mumps Outbreaks

In some years, there are more cases of mumps than usual because of outbreaks. Mumps outbreaks can occur any time of year. A major factor contributing to outbreaks is being in a crowded environment, such as attending the same class, playing on the same sports team, or living in a dormitory with a person who has mumps. Also, certain behaviors that result in exchanging saliva, such as kissing or sharing utensils, cups, lipstick or cigarettes, might increase spread of the virus.

MMR vaccine prevents most, but not all, cases of mumps and complications caused by the disease. Two doses of the vaccine are 88% (range: 66 to 95%) effective at protecting against mumps; one dose is 78% (range: 49% to 92%) effective. The MMR vaccine protects against currently circulating mumps strains. Outbreaks can still occur in highly vaccinated U.S. communities, particularly in close-contact settings. In recent years, outbreaks have occurred in schools, colleges, and camps. However, high vaccination coverage helps limit the size, duration, and spread of mumps outbreaks.

Although it is not mandatory to report mumps outbreaks to CDC, many health departments will contact CDC when they experience an unusually high number of cases. In 2015 and 2016, a number of cases and outbreaks have been reported to CDC, primarily associated with college settings. These outbreaks have ranged in size from a few to several hundred cases, have mostly affected young adults, and are likely due to a combination of factors. These factors include the known effectiveness of the vaccine, lack of previous exposure to wild-type virus, and the intensity of the exposure setting (such as a college campus) coupled with behaviors that increase the risk of transmission.

Resources: https://www.cdc.gov/mumps/outbreaks.html 

Signs & Symptoms:  https://www.cdc.gov/mumps/about/signs-symptoms.html

For information about how to prevent mumps from spreading, see Outbreak-Related Questions and Answers for Patients.

Vaccine Schedule for Children & Adults 

 

Emotions and Heart Disease

In the past 40 years, cases of heart disease in the U.S. have dropped by 20 percent.1 Now, that’s news worth celebrating! Efforts at prevention, detection, and treatment appear to paying off. For example, Americans’ cholesterol levels keep falling. Researchers think that ditching trans fats from our diets may be one reason why.2

Still, heart disease here remains the number-one cause of death in both men and women.2 We can do so much more to support our faithful tickers. You might be surprised to learn how much your emotional health influences your heart. Check out a few recent studies:

Pessimism. A study lasting 11 years looked at the risks linked to pessimism among 3,000 men and women. And guess what? That “glass-half-empty” attitude seemed to have a pretty big impact. Those who were most pessimistic were twice as likely to die of heart disease as the least pessimistic. The researchers can’t prove that negativity caused the rise in heart-related deaths. But this emotion can lead to an increase in hormones related to stress and inflammation. And, that might help explain the link.3

Worry. An even larger study of 7,000 Norwegians also found a link between worrying about a heart attack and actually having one. The “worried well” were twice as likely to have a heart attack as those who weren’t anxious about their health. Again, the link can’t be proven, but physical changes from anxiety are the likely culprit.4

Depression. Over 10 years, researchers tracked 1,100 women and found that those with a history of depression had a much higher risk of heart disease. In fact, in women younger than 65 with no history of heart problems, depression was the only significant risk factor linked with developing heart disease. Depression can produce stress hormones. But it may it may also lead to unhealthy behaviors that can increase the risks.5

Anger. Either intense anger or physical exertion doubles the odds of having a first heart attack. Even worse? Combining the two triples that risk, according to a study of 12,000 people. Chances are, anger and intense activity simply trigger an attack in people who already have artery-clogging plaques, say the researchers. Intense emotions or activity may cause a domino effect: A rise in blood pressure and heart rate constricts blood vessels. That, in turn, causes plaques to rupture and cut off blood flow to the heart.6

Spotting any trends, anyone?

With medical help or even self-care such as meditation or relaxation exercises, you can learn how to shift some of these moods. If these emotions are a challenge for you, I’ll also do what I can to help. For one thing, I can point you to reliable sources of health information.  Together we can work on managing blood pressure including discussing a few changes to your diet and lifestyle.  Review the signs of a heart attack and make an appointment with your doctor today to know your overall health.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

Sources:

  1. HealthDay: U.S. Heart Disease Rates Fell 20 Percent Since 1980s: Study. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162007.html Accessed 1-3-17.
  1. HealthDay: Americans’ Cholesterol Levels Keep Falling. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162292.html Accessed 1-3-17.
  1. HealthDay: Pessimism May Take Unwelcome Toll on the Heart. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162083.html Accessed 1-3-17.
  1. HealthDay: Hypochondriacs May Worry Themselves Into Heart Trouble. Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161838.html Accessed 1-3-17.
  2. Women’s Brain Health Initiative: Depression Can Fuel Heart Disease in Midlife Women: Available at: http://womensbrainhealth.org/think-twice/depression-can-fuel-heart-disease-in-midlife-women Accessed 1-4-17.
  1. HealthDay: Anger, Heavy Exertion: Fast Track to a Heart Attack? Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161395.html Accessed 1-4-17.