Z-Fence: All-Natural Mosquito and Insect Repellent

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Mosquitoes are not only annoying, but they also carry a number of serious diseases like malaria, yellow fever, typhus, West Nile virus, and Zika. And many mosquito repellents today contain DEET, which is effective, but not very safe, especially when it comes to children. Did you know that only about a third of insect repellents on the market today are safe for kids?

Pharm A Save Monroe now carries  Z Bracelet, Z Band and Z Clip – a NO DEET alternative to those pesky mosquitoes !

How It Works

The entire Z-Fence line is based on specially-formulated repellents that are gentle, all-natural, and safe for the whole family. They work through a slow-release technology, which diffuses into soft material so it releases at a steady and consistent rate. The release of the repellent creates a 6-foot wide “safe zone” around the user or area, which serves as a barrier against insects.
The ingredients used in Z-Fence products are made from a mix of plant extracts, including geraniol, thyme, geranium oil, peppermint oil, and citronella. These are all registered with the EPA as acceptable active ingredients with minimum risk. Our products have also been tested at an independent lab here in the U.S. to make sure they are both safe and effective.

For outdoor lovers, we carry e a variety of wearable items that include a similar natural, slow-release repellent built in. Even with all-natural repellent formulas, some people can have reactions to putting insect repellent directly on their skin, and our wearable products offer a great alternative. The braided Z-Bracelet is actually infused with the natural repellent. The neoprene Z-Band has an adjustable fit, and holds a replaceable repellent tablet, as does the Z-Clip which easily goes anywhere. The bands and clips each include 2 tablets, which last up to 120 hours, so there’s no need to re-apply like you would with a spray. Packs of extra Z-Tablet refills are of course available.

With Z-Fence, you can stop worry about the dangers of mosquitoes and harmful chemicals, and get back to enjoying life outdoors!

 

Protect Yourself from the Sun

Protect Yourself from the Sun

Did you know that skin cancer rates are on the rise in the U.S., where it is the most common type of cancer?1 It’s no wonder. Just in the past year alone, one-third of the adult population has been sunburned at least once. And that lobster-red look is a clear sign of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays—a known cause of skin cancer, which can impact any age, gender, or race.1,2

Risks of tanning. But you’re not off the hook if you stop at tanning. That’s your body’s response to sun injury.1 When you tan—either outdoors or indoors—you increase your risk of melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer. You also increase your risk of:

  • Premature skin aging—wrinkles and age spots
  • Damaged skin texture
  • Potentially blinding eye diseases1

Here’s the silver lining in this gloomy cloud: Avoiding the sun’s UV rays is one of the best ways to prevent skin cancer.1

General guidelines. You probably know the drill, but it bears repeating:

  1. Seek shade and stay out of the sun, if you can, when UV rays are strongest—from 10 am to 4 pm.
  2. Be extra careful at higher altitudes where skin burns faster.
  3. Limit exposure to water, sand, snow, and concrete—surfaces that reflect light.
  4. Use sun protection even on cloudy days, when certain types of UV rays can be stronger.
  5. Rely on diet and supplements to get your vitamin D, not the sun.2,3

Sunscreen. Don’t use a product that combines sunscreen and insect repellant. Reapplying it will expose you to too much of the repellent’s ingredients. Also, avoid spray tans and bronzers—they won’t protect your skin from UV rays.4

Do choose sunscreens that:

  • Block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Are labeled with sun protection factor (SPF) 30 or higher.
  • Are water resistant—they’re more protective when you sweat.
  • Are products you will use consistently. Generally, creams are best for dry skin and the face, gels work well for hairy areas, and sticks are easier to apply near eyes. Mineral-based sunscreens—such as zinc oxide or titanium dioxide—work well if you have sensitive skin.2,3

Wear sunscreen every day, even if you plan to be outside a short time. For best results, apply it generously 15 to 30 minutes before you go outside to all exposed areas—don’t forget your feet and ears. (A lip balm works best for your lips.) Always reapply after swimming or sweating and about every two hours or as often as the package suggests.2,3

Sun-protective clothing. In addition to sunscreen, wear clothing that can better protect you such as:

  • A hat with a wide brim. This works better than a baseball cap or visor for shielding your whole face from the sun.
  • Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Loose-fitting, unbleached, tightly woven fabrics.
  • Special clothing that absorbs UV rays.3

Don’t forget to protect those parts of your body that may be in constant sunlight— your nose, forehead, and eyes.  Questions about sun-protection products or other ways to protect your family in the sun? Remember, I’m right here—your ready resource.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

Sources:

  1. CDC: “The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer.” Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/consumer-booklet.pdf Accessed 6-6-17.
  2. American Academy of Dermatology: “Sunscreen FAQs.” Available at: https://www.aad.org/media/stats/prevention-and-care/sunscreen-faqs Accessed 6-6-17.
  3. MedlinePlus: “Sun Protection.” Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000378.htm Accessed 6-6-17.
  4. FDA: “5 Tips for a Healthy Vacation.” Available at: https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm389469.htm Accessed 6-6-17.

Protect Yourself from the Sun

Protect Yourself from the Sun

Did you know that skin cancer rates are on the rise in the U.S., where it is the most common type of cancer?1 It’s no wonder. Just in the past year alone, one-third of the adult population has been sunburned at least once. And that lobster-red look is a clear sign of exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays—a known cause of skin cancer, which can impact any age, gender, or race.1,2

Risks of tanning. But you’re not off the hook if you stop at tanning. That’s your body’s response to sun injury.1 When you tan—either outdoors or indoors—you increase your risk of melanoma—the deadliest form of skin cancer. You also increase your risk of:

  • Premature skin aging—wrinkles and age spots
  • Damaged skin texture
  • Potentially blinding eye diseases1

Here’s the silver lining in this gloomy cloud: Avoiding the sun’s UV rays is one of the best ways to prevent skin cancer.1

General guidelines. You probably know the drill, but it bears repeating:

  1. Seek shade and stay out of the sun, if you can, when UV rays are strongest—from 10 am to 4 pm.
  2. Be extra careful at higher altitudes where skin burns faster.
  3. Limit exposure to water, sand, snow, and concrete—surfaces that reflect light.
  4. Use sun protection even on cloudy days, when certain types of UV rays can be stronger.
  5. Rely on diet and supplements to get your vitamin D, not the sun.2,3

Sunscreen. Don’t use a product that combines sunscreen and insect repellant. Reapplying it will expose you to too much of the repellent’s ingredients. Also, avoid spray tans and bronzers—they won’t protect your skin from UV rays.4

Do choose sunscreens that:

  • Block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Are labeled with sun protection factor (SPF) 30 or higher.
  • Are water resistant—they’re more protective when you sweat.
  • Are products you will use consistently. Generally, creams are best for dry skin and the face, gels work well for hairy areas, and sticks are easier to apply near eyes. Mineral-based sunscreens—such as zinc oxide or titanium dioxide—work well if you have sensitive skin.2,3

Wear sunscreen every day, even if you plan to be outside a short time. For best results, apply it generously 15 to 30 minutes before you go outside to all exposed areas—don’t forget your feet and ears. (A lip balm works best for your lips.) Always reapply after swimming or sweating and about every two hours or as often as the package suggests.2,3

Sun-protective clothing. In addition to sunscreen, wear clothing that can better protect you such as:

  • A hat with a wide brim. This works better than a baseball cap or visor for shielding your whole face from the sun.
  • Sunglasses that block both UVA and UVB rays.
  • Long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
  • Loose-fitting, unbleached, tightly woven fabrics.
  • Special clothing that absorbs UV rays.3

Don’t forget to protect those parts of your body that may be in constant sunlight— your nose, forehead, and eyes.  Questions about sun-protection products or other ways to protect your family in the sun? Remember, I’m right here—your ready resource.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

Sources:

  1. CDC: “The Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer.” Available at: https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/pdf/consumer-booklet.pdf Accessed 6-6-17.
  2. American Academy of Dermatology: “Sunscreen FAQs.” Available at: https://www.aad.org/media/stats/prevention-and-care/sunscreen-faqs Accessed 6-6-17.
  3. MedlinePlus: “Sun Protection.” Available at: https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000378.htm Accessed 6-6-17.
  4. FDA: “5 Tips for a Healthy Vacation.” Available at: https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm389469.htm Accessed 6-6-17.

Flu Clinic – Let our Pharmacist’s come to your business!

I know, summer just started! But it is time to book offsite influenza vaccines for this fall.

Our Pharmacists, John and Shaunett will go to places of business to vaccinate the employees. Even better, we can bill the employee’s health insurance! That is right, as an employer, if the employee has health insurance, there is no out of pocket expense for you!

During the  2016-2017 season, Pharm A Save Monroe Pharmacist’s provided the vaccine’s for the Monroe School District employees, Damar Monroe, Ocean Beauty as well as other large groups & individuals in the Sky Valley Community.

Getting signed up is easy, just give me a call or send me an email. Our first round of vaccines are booking for September and October. Don’t wait to reserve your companies influenza vaccines,  get your onsite flu clinic scheduled today!

Bridgett Edgar – Pharmacy Technician/Owner

Pharm A Save Monroe – A Health Mart Pharmacy

(360) 794 7351 ext 202

bridgett@pasmonroe.com

 

 

 

Men and Hearing Loss

Men and Hearing Loss

“You don’t know what you got till it’s gone.” Depending upon your age, these words may recall the lyrics of a 1970s folk song by Joni Mitchell. But you might want to listen up and consider these words another kind of warning—especially if you’re a man.

More people with hearing loss. Today, twice as many people have hearing loss as in the 1980s. And sadly the trend isn’t improving. A recent report predicted that the number of U.S. adults with hearing loss will rise to nearly a quarter of the population in the next 40 years.1 Perhaps we’ve adapted just a bit too well to all the noise in our environment—from rock shows and subways to motorcycles and kids’ toys.

The story is even more sobering for men. That’s because hearing loss may be more common and severe in men than in women. One likely reason is that more men than women are exposed to sustained loud noises.2

Links to other health issues. Increasingly, researchers are seeing links between hearing loss and other health issues—problems that often affect men. These include sleep apnea, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression, and dementia.3 Consider this:

  • Sleep apnea is strongly linked to hearing loss at both high and low frequencies.
  • The inner ear is so sensitive to blood flow that it could be the “canary in the coal mine” for cardiovascular disease. In other words, blood vessel blockages might show up here first.
  • Hearing loss is twice as common in people with diabetes.
  • Research also shows a link between hearing loss and dementia.
  • In people with both depression and hearing loss, use of hearing aids reduces symptoms of depression.3

Protect your hearing. You may have already experienced some hearing loss. But that doesn’t mean you can’t protect what’s left. Start here:

  • Get earplugs for loud events—and wear them! Even the simple foam plugs you can buy in our store can help protect your ears.
  • Let’s talk painkillers. A study in men found that taking painkillers like aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), or acetaminophen only two times a week significantly increased the risk of hearing loss. These drugs may do this by reducing blood flow to the inner ear. If you’re concerned, let’s discuss this.4
  • Consider an iron test. By contrast, iron helps carry blood to the inner ear. That may be why low levels have been linked to hearing problems.1
  • Check the volume. It’s really tempting to turn up the volume, especially for your favorite tunes. Resist!

Of course, your doctor should first rule out a medical problem that could be causing any hearing loss. Then, let me know if you would like any guidance about specialists who can help evaluate your hearing or help you choose a hearing device. Just remember: these are not your father’s hearing aids. Today’s hearing aids are nearly invisible, can adjust to different environments, and benefit from many high-tech features.3

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

Sources

1.       Men’s Journal: “You’re Losing Hearing Faster Than You Think.” Available at: http://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/articles/youre-losing-hearing-faster-than-you-think-w475579 Accessed 4-27-17.
2.       Medscape: “Age-related hearing loss in men.” Available at: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/520157 Accessed 4-27-17.
3.       Better Hearing Institute: “Calling All Men: Protect Your Well-Being with a Hearing Check.” Available at: http://www.betterhearing.org/news/calling-all-men-protect-your-well-being-hearing-check Accessed 4-27-17.
4.       Curhan SG et al. Am J Med.2010;123(3):231–237. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2831770/ Accessed 4-27-17.