Can I help you find something?

It happens all day long. People wander into Pharm A Save Monroe looking for a specific item. I ask, “Can I help you find something?”  I hear “Oh no, I am just looking.” After about 5 minutes, I see the same person is still roaming each aisle and looking back and forth in the Aids to daily living aisle. I ask , “Are you finding what you are looking for?” The response this time was, “I am getting ready for my father in law to move in with us, and I am trying to get a list together of the items we need before he gets there.”

That is where it all begins…..

From experience personally and within Pharm A Save Monroe, I have learned to ask a lot of questions to help get to a solution. You see, at Pharm A Save Monroe, we are not trying to sell you just “anything”, we are trying to help you make a decision on what best fits your needs.  More often than not, I help put a list together of items that may be helpful, and the customer leaves with a ideas and homework.  This give them the opportunity to discuss it with other caregivers, spouses and family. And, many times, that same person will purchase items from an “Online” store. Does this bother me? You may be be surprised with my answer.

Although every business needs to make sales to keep the doors open, Pharm A Save Monroe is focused on the patient and their needs. Each need differs from person to person. This also holds true for each persons financial situation and living environment. Pharm A Save does more that “Just sell prescription drugs”. The entire store is full of equipment and supplies. Sometimes some it up like this: You don’t know that you need it , until you need it.

I also supply information on local resources, insurance coverage reviews to see if an item is covered , and hugs. Hugs come free with the information.

So, does it bother me that so much time was spent with this person and there was no sale made? No, not at all.

You see, this was an opportunity for me to share my knowledge and expertise. And, this person was thankful for this knowledge. She left here feeling like she was better prepaired to make home adjustments for her father in law. In fact, this “person” and the “she” I am referring to is Jenny. I know this because I asked her what her name was. This was a personal interaction with Jenny, who was overwhelmed with where to start. I also gave Jenny my business card. I asked her to call or email anytime. I meant it, anytime. Not just if there was a question about a product, service or insurance. If I didn’t have an solution or answer, I could find someone who woud. But to call or email anytime. It is important for Jenny to have a way to communicate about different struggles she may run into during this transition.

Here is what happened next.

Jenny told her friend how happy she was that I took the time to help explain some of the available items and what obstacles may be coming in the future. Her friend, Saul, stopped in to purchase a Pik Stik. He did that because Jenny told him that Pharm A Save Monroe had these on the shelf. When speaking with Saul, he mentioned that he has a hard time getting in and out of his car. On most days, Saul did fine. But sometimes, it was just too much. I mentioned to him that we have a drive thru window, and if he called ahead, we could have items ready for him to pick up there. In the end, Saul transferred his prescriptions to Pharm A Save Monroe. Our Pharmacist packages them up for him each month in pill reminders. Saul is doing better managing his diabetes and blood pressure, now that he is remembering to take his medications.

And Jenny?

Jenny ran into one of those obstacles we discussed. She came into Pharm A Save Monroe and asked for me help. Jenny purchased the needed bed rails. The next time I heard from Jenny was at Christmas. She brought in a plate of fudge, peanut butter bars and a card.

To all of us at Pharm A Save Monroe, that is a success story.

Fun in the Sun – or Defeat in the Heat?

Fun in the Sun—or Defeat in the Heat?

Did you know that the number of hot days—and warm nights—is increasing? In the U.S., record high temperatures now outnumber record lows at least two to one.1 What can you do to protect yourself in a heat wave—or simply in the hot summer sun?

Know signs of trouble. Heat cramps are an early sign that your body is suffering from the heat—they’re more likely with heavy exercise or work. Along with muscle cramps, you may sweat heavily and feel very thirsty or fatigued.2

Heat exhaustion can happen when you lose lots of fluids from heavy sweating.3 These are a few other signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness or feeling weak or confused
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Cool, moist skin
  • Dark-colored urine, a sign of dehydration2,4

If not treated, heat exhaustion can develop into heatstroke, which can be deadly because the body loses the ability to cool itself. Call 9-1-1 if someone shows signs of shock, becomes very confused, has a seizure, has a fever over 102 degrees F, breathes rapidly or has a rapid pulse, or loses consciousness. 2,3

Nip problems in the bud. If you have symptoms of heat exhaustion, get out of the heat as quickly as you can. Rest in a cool, shady place with your feet raised. Drink plenty of fluids, but avoid alcohol or caffeine. Apply cool compresses or take a cool shower or bath. Contact a doctor if you don’t feel better within 30 minutes.4

Beat the heat. In a heat wave, take these steps:

  • Avoid taxing activities if you can.
  • Stay indoors during the hottest hours of the day. The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays are strongest between 10 am and 4 pm.5
  • If you don’t have air conditioning, go to a library, mall, or other public place to cool down for a few hours.
  • Wear lightweight, loose-fitting clothing. Avoid dark colors, which trap the heat.
  • Use a hat or umbrella outdoors.
  • Allow your car to cool off before you get in.
  • Drink water and eat small meals often. Drink less alcohol and fewer caffeinated drinks.
  • Don’t take salt tablets unless your doctor tells you to.2,3,4

Protect those at increased risk. Help protect those who are most vulnerable in the heat. That includes children, older adults, and people who are obese, ill, exercising vigorously, or not used to the heat or high humidity.2 For example, make sure young ones drink plenty of water. And you might check in on your elderly neighbor once in a while.

It’s important to know that certain medicines can also increase your risk of heatstroke. This includes allergy, blood pressure, and seizure drugs as well as medicines used for mental health conditions. Let’s talk this over to make sure you stay safe and know the signs of problems. And, if you have a chronic condition, it’s a great idea to ask
your doctor about other ways to lower your risk of heatstroke. 4

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

Sources:

  1. Climate Communication: Heat Waves. Available at: https://www.climatecommunication.org/new/features/extreme-weather/heat-waves/ Accessed 5-23-16.
  2. MedlinePlus: Heat emergencies. Available at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000056.htm Accessed 5-23-16.
  3. Healthy Roads Media: Heat Waves. Available at: https://healthreach.nlm.nih.gov/documents/EngHeatWaves.pdf Accessed 5-23-16.
  4. org: Heat exhaustion and Heatstroke. Available at: http://familydoctor.org/familydoctor/en/prevention-wellness/staying-healthy/first-aid/heat-exhaustion-an-heatstroke.printerview.all.html Accessed 5-23-16.

FDA: Sun Protection. Available at:  http://www.fda.gov/Radiation-EmittingProducts/RadiationEmittingProductsandProcedures/Tanning/ucm116445.htm