Prepare for an emergency

This past Test Run made me realize that we NEED to be prepared for no warmth, or communication. Time to keep the gas ready for the generator and walkie talkies charged.

Pharm A Save Monroe

Well, it is November, and it happened AGAIN! Snohomish county had a major flood. This resulted in closed roads, power outages, no cell service, no home phone service and well, you get it.

You wouldn’t guess that last night we were all wondering how we would get home. In fact, when I heard the emergency broadcast system announce major flooding in Gold Bar, I was out of here!

This got me thinking …. what if we were out of contact for, lets say, 3 or more days? What if I once again forgot to pick up my prescription, and had NONE? Great, I have canned food, but do I have a can opener that isn’t electric?

I know this for sure, even though money is tight, you need to have your medicine cabinet ready for an emergency. An emergency could be similar to what was experienced yesterday. Or, it could…

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Prepare for an emergency

Well, it is November, and it happened AGAIN! Snohomish county had a major flood. This resulted in closed roads, power outages, no cell service, no home phone service and well, you get it.

You wouldn’t guess that last night we were all wondering how we would get home. In fact, when I heard the emergency broadcast system announce major flooding in Gold Bar, I was out of here!

This got me thinking …. what if we were out of contact for, lets say, 3 or more days? What if I once again forgot to pick up my prescription, and had NONE? Great, I have canned food, but do I have a can opener that isn’t electric?

I know this for sure, even though money is tight, you need to have your medicine cabinet ready for an emergency. An emergency could be similar to what was experienced yesterday. Or, it could be the flu or a family emergency out of town.

Here is a rule of thumb from me – the pharmacy technician and the one at home who gets stuck in the scramble during these emergencies.

  • Your insurance company will let you fill your prescription 5-7 days early.

It does depend on the drug and your plan, but that is a pretty standard thing. If you fill your prescriptions BEFORE you run out (and pick them up), you can easily accumulate an extra week supply.

  • Keep a three day emergency supply of your medications at work, in your purse or in your car.

This is not always ideal, depending on what the storage requirements are for your medications. But, what if you cannot get home? Do you have your seizure medication with you?

  • Keep a medication list with you at all times

Emergency or not, this is a must! Having a list of medications will always help during an emergency, especially if you are unable to speak for yourself.

  • Emergency override

During the fires this past summer, we received notice that insurance companies were paying for early prescription refills if the patient was in an evacuation area. It is important to know that if you are ever displaced, there are options. Be sure to let your pharmacy know what your situation is so they can contact your insurance company. If you are out of town, the pharmacy of your choosing can call your local pharmacy (I hope it is Pharm A Save) to have your prescription transferred. Just remember, depending on the medication, you may not be able to transfer it back. In those cases, your physician can re issue you a prescription to have filled when it is due next.

I could type for days on emergencies. I will say, I don’t have an emergency kit in my car, and neither do my family members. I will have one after this “test run”. Even Tylenol, band-aids, contact solution , pads, eyelash glue – a duplicate of my daily needed items.

Bridget Edgar

Pharmacy Technician

www.pharmasavemonroe.com

Mother, Wife, Grandmother, Daughter, Friend and MORE

 

Home Care Equipment

It is that time of the year when you need or have to have “a little tune-up” on your body such as a bunionectomy, knee or hip replacement.  Or you were doing something you enjoyed and fractured your ankle or leg. Even worse, did something to your back. Thank goodness for the wonderful and brilliant physician’s and surgeons that we have access to when we need them so that we can get  “tuned back-up”.

Some of the things to make a successful  recovery from any health issue is the access to Medical Equipment and the knowledge of someone in the profession to help make the correct choices for recovery. Just taking a bath or a shower can be daunting BUT when you see the vast amount of bath chairs, stools an transfer benches that are available, the decision is easy. You just need to take the time to look at what is available and the best for YOU!

Turning Leg Caddy, Roll A Bout, Knee Scooter, whatever you want to call them…it is one of the best item(s) available for an ankle or foot  fracture or injury if you need to be non-weight bearing for a successful outcome. They come in sizes, heights and style to accommodate the right size of a person.

Ever used a walker? What a great inexpensive item to assist you when crutches are just to much to handle. After having my knee replaced this past summer, I have a new respect for product. Seats and brakes are a great extra for someone who uses one daily and needs to sit and rest at times.

Bottom line…Pharm A Save has whatever you need to get back on your feet!

Sue Graafstra

Managing Diabetes Medications

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It’s not the kind of club you really want to belong to. Today, nearly half of all American adults have type 2 diabetes or are at risk of getting it.1

If you count yourself among them, you know that managing your diabetes medications is something you can’t afford to ignore. If not well managed, diabetes can lead to serious complications. They include cardiovascular disease; nerve, kidney, eye, and foot damage; and hearing problems.2

Recent research. A study of 350,000 people with type 2 diabetes found that people with poorly managed diabetes were also 50 percent more likely to have dementia.3 Other recent studies have found that diabetes appears to take a particular toll on women’s hearts. Looking at nearly 11 million people, one study found the risk was almost 40 percent higher in women than in men.4

Whether woman or man, however, staying on top of medication management clearly needs to be top of mind.

Types of medications. As you likely know, managing blood sugar (glucose) is at the heart of diabetes control. If you can’t get the job done with diet and exercise alone, medications are essential. The drugs you take will depend upon the type of diabetes you have, along with other factors.5

Insulin moves glucose from your blood into your cells. This helps keep glucose in the right range. If your body doesn’t make enough insulin, you will need to take it by injection, pen, pump, jet injector, or infuser.5

There are also many types of diabetes pills, which work in different ways. For example, they may:

  • Decrease the glucose released from your liver
  • Stimulate the pancreas to release more insulin
  • Make your body more sensitive to the effects of insulin
  • Slow absorption of carbohydrates into your bloodstream after eating6

Some people take more than one pill, a combination pill, or a combination of pills and insulin. There are also new types of injected medicines available to keep blood sugar from going too high after eating.5

Medication review.  Be sure to follow your treatment plan, but let your doctor know if you experience any side effects. If you’re a senior, this is more important than ever. Your body responds differently to drugs as you age. This means you’re at greater risk of overtreatment, which can cause blood sugar levels to go too low. And this can cause problems such as confusion or falls. 7

You may need to cut back or change medications. Just because a drug worked well for you in the past doesn’t mean it will continue to do so. If you have questions about this, I can go over your list of medications and see how they are working for you. Also, be sure to check in at least once a year with your doctor about your diabetes medications. Never stop or change your medications without first talking it over with your doctor.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

Sources:

  1. HealthDay: Half of U.S. Adults Have Diabetes or High Risk of Getting It: Report. Available at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154517.html Accessed 11-3-15.
  2.  Mayo Clinic: “Complications.” Available at: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/basics/complications/con-20033091. Accessed 11-5-15.
  3.  HealthDay: Tight Control of Type 2 Diabetes May Help Prevent Dementia. Available at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154639.html Accessed 11-3-15.
  4.  HealthDay: Diabetes Takes a Toll on Women’s Hearts. Available at: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154609.html Accessed 11-3-15.
  5.  NIDDK: “What I need to know about Diabetes Medicines.” Available at: http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/Diabetes/diabetes-medicines/Pages/index.aspx#what Accessed 11-5-15.
  6. Joslin Diabetes Center: “Oral Diabetes Medications Summary Chart.” Available at: http://www.joslin.org/info/oral_diabetes_medications_summary_chart.html Accessed 11-5-15.
  7. HealthDay: Too Many Seniors With Diabetes Are Overtreated, Study Suggests. Available at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155428.html   Accessed 11-3-15.